1. … And that wherever they might be they always remember that the past was a lie, that memory has no return, that every spring gone by could never be recovered, and that the wildest and most tenacious love was an ephemeral truth in the end.
    — One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel García Márquez (via themoonisgreen)
     
  2.  
  3. Perhaps this is what the stories meant when they called somebody heartsick. Your heart and your stomach and your whole insides felt empty and hollow and aching.
    — Gabriel Garcia Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude (via aslongasyouadoreme)
     
  4. Starting The Inheritance of Loss. Anyone else read it? Found the prose style a little heavily constructed at first, but I’m really starting to get into it. 

     
  5. literatebitch:

     March Book Photo Challenge

    Day 14: Yummy

     
  6. Accidentally fell asleep on the couch while listening to the audiobook of The Golden Compass when I should have been working on applying for jobs. I think this is a pretty good sign that I am not at all equipped to be a functional adult. 

     
  7. image: Download

    whitney-chen:

My slowly-accumulating collection of Penguin Classics.Lolita by Vladmir NabakovMadame Bovary by Gustave FlaubertThe Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-ExupéryHigh Fidelity by Nick HornbyLove in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Márquez

    whitney-chen:

    My slowly-accumulating collection of Penguin Classics.

    Lolita by Vladmir Nabakov
    Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
    The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
    High Fidelity by Nick Hornby
    Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Márquez

     
  8. 16:30

    Notes: 748

    Reblogged from nouvellabooks

    Tags: Zadie Smith

    image: Download

    nouvellabooks:

theparisreview:

“Rome says: enjoy me. London: survive me. New York: gimme all you got.”
Read Zadie Smith’s story from our Spring issue, now available in its entirety online.

Yes, Zadie, always.

    nouvellabooks:

    theparisreview:

    “Rome says: enjoy me. London: survive me. New York: gimme all you got.”

    Read Zadie Smith’s story from our Spring issue, now available in its entirety online.

    Yes, Zadie, always.

     
  9. I wonder how this is judged. By comparison to the original by someone who speaks both English and the language the book’s written in? Or just from reading the English translation?

    (Source: hmhlit)

     
  10. 'Reading,' he says, 'is always this: there is a thing that is there, a thing made of writing, a solid, material object, which cannot be changed, and through this thing we measure ourselves against something else that is not present, something else that belongs to the immaterial, invisible world, because it can only be thought, imagined, or because it was once and is no longer, past, lost, unattainable, in the land of the dead…'
    — Italo Calvio, If on a Winter’s Night a Traveller